Continuously Improve Outcomes

You need to make sure you’re making decisions based on actionable intelligence. As you do so, you can optimize the use of your resources, achieve healthcare performance improvement and optimal outcomes and protect and grow the lines of business that are profitable for you.

We have the ability to predictably and effectively deploy tools that provide a clear picture of how well you are doing clinically, financially and operationally.

We are the industry leader in analytics for healthcare with more than 1,000 facilities, including hospitals, physician practices and health plans. Additional capabilities include predictive patient demand forecasting and resource alignment, patient flow management and productivity benchmarking.

Find more tips and solutions for your organization’s healthcare performance improvement by subscribing to the Focus Ahead blog to the right.

Posts:

McKesson Corporation

Managing Denials Can Result in a Big Payoff in Margin Improvement

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Managing Denials Can Result in a Big Payoff in Margin Improvement

One in five claims are delayed or denied, creating 3% loss of net revenue. Not only do these denials erode the provider organization’s bottom line, they require an inordinate amount of administrative work for both payers and providers. But they don’t need to. Technology now exists to stop the denials, improve the process and allow organizations to make more investments in the front end of the revenue cycle.

Erkan Akyuz

Accelerating to Value-Based Care: 3 Ideas to Help You Maintain Enthusiasm and Momentum

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Value-based care will lead to lower costs, higher efficiency, and better patient outcomes. But sometimes, focus on the day-to- day logistics of your transition can cause you to lose sight of the larger goal. If you find enthusiasm for your value-based care initiatives waning — whether you’re halfway there, haven’t yet started, or are in the final sprint to the finish – consider these three ideas.

Billie Whitehurst

Three Key Reasons Hospitals Struggle to Improve Patient Outcomes and Labor Costs

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Relying on intuition, some healthcare leaders think there is an inverse relationship between positive patient outcomes and healthy labor costs. When labor costs improve, they assume staff is reduced and patient outcomes suffer. And when labor costs worsen, leadership believes it’s easier to meet quality goals and control length of stay. But it doesn’t have to be that way.